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Book Contents

Book Index

Glossary of Terms

In This Section

AJAX

DNS - Domain Name Service

Resource Planner View or Gantt Chart

IFRAME

iCalendar (RFC-5545)

Resource

Resource Type

Rollup Calendars

RSS (Really Simple Syndication)

Servlet

Virtual Host

See Also

Reference

Internationalization and Localization

Appendix A - Software Installation Checklist

Appendix B - Section 508 Accessibility

Appendix C - Importing Religious Holiday Calendars

Appendix D - Importing Data From Connect Daily Into Google Calendar

Book Index

AJAX

AJAX is an acronym that stands for Asynchronous Javascript and XML. It's a way of creating web pages that dynamically update without forcing a page reload.

The way it usually works is that a User will click on a link on a page triggering some Javascript. That Javascript will then connect to a server and retrieve data, usually in XML format. When the data is returned, more Javascript takes that data, formats it, and places it on the web page.

As mentioned above, the advantage of using Ajax is that it can happen without a page reload, giving the illusion of faster operation.

The disadvantage of Ajax is that it requires the use of JavaScript in the page and this makes it more difficult to test and debug your web pages.

Recommended Reading

Ajax for Dummies, Steve Holzner, PHD, Wiley Publishing, Inc., Indianapolis Indiana, ISBN: 0-471-78597-0

Mastering Ajax, Bret McLaughlin, IBM Developer Works Technical Library

Book Index

DNS - Domain Name Service

When you use a web browser on the internet, you type in the name of the site you want to visit. For example, www.mhsoftware.com. DNS converts the computer name into an address that your request can be delivered to. In order for a computer name to resolve, the DNS administrator must create a mapping entry that contains the host name of the computer and the address of this computer.

If the host name is not configured by a DNS administrator, then attempts to view pages on that computer with a browser will return a Server Not Found error.

See Also: Virtual Host

Book Index

Resource Planner View or Gantt Chart


The Gantt chart or Resource Planner View (invented by Henry Gantt) is a time-phased graphic display of activity durations. It is also referred to as a bar chart. Activities are listed with other tabular information on the left side with time intervals over the bars. Activity durations are shown in the form of horizontal bars.

Source: Wideman Comparative Glossary of Project Management Terms V 2.1

IFRAME

An IFRAME is an HTML In-Line Frame. It can be used to create a portal within a web page. The content of the inline frame or portal is supplied by a URL to another web page. It is not necessary for the URL to be on the same server. In other words, the IFRAME content can come from an entirely different page or site.

For the technically minded, the IFRAME acts like a scrollable DIV where you can set a source URL for the content.

The HTML code for an IFRAME would look something like this:

<iframe frameborder="no" scrolling="no" id="calendarframe" 
src="http://calendar.sample.com/View.html" width="690" height="1024>
</iframe>

Book Index

iCalendar (RFC-5545)

iCal is a text file format designed for publishing calendar information. For information about the iCal format, refer to RFC-5545 Internet Calendaring and Scheduling Core Object Specification (iCalendar). Many programs allow you to subscribe to remote calendars and have them appear transparently with the rest of your schedule.

Some programs that support iCalendar include:

The RFC for iCal is available from:

http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc5545.txt

Book Index

Resource


A resource is an item or location that is used by people for events. Some sample resources would be:

Book Index

Resource Type


Resource Type is a category for resources. Sample resource types would be:

Audio Visual Equipment

  • LCD Projectors
  • VCRs
  • Video Cameras

Facility

  • Conference Room #1
  • Conference Room #2
  • Auditorium

Vehicles

  • Truck
  • Car

Book Index

Rollup Calendars

Connect Daily allows you to combine calendars so that you can view different calendars together.

For example, the city of Denver has teams for the following sports:

Each team has their own calendar so visitors can see games just for their sport. Connect Daily allows you to create a Sports Calendar that would combine all of the individual team calendars into one calendar. Visitors can now see all of the games happening on one day without having to visit different calendars.

Book Index

RSS (Really Simple Syndication)

RSS is an acronym that stands for Really Simple Syndication. Essentially it is a text file format designed for publishing news articles. The text is formatted XML. There are many readers that let people subscribe to RSS feeds and aggregate them together in one application. You can also use RSS feeds to create dynamic HTML for inclusion in websites.

A detailed description of RSS can be found at:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Really_Simple_Syndication

The specification for RSS 2.0 can be found at:

http://www.rssboard.org/rss-specification

Book Index

Servlet

Servlets are a technology developed by Sun Microsystems for creating dynamic web applications. They are similar in concept to Microsoft Active Server Pages, or PHP, or CGI programs. Sun Microsystems has since been acquired by Oracle Corporation.

Many vendors support Java Servlets. Some vendors include BEA, IBM, Oracle, Adobe, and others.

Book Index

Virtual Host

In Internet terminology, host is just another word for a computer. For example, if I refer to the host name for our website, I would refer to www.mhsoftware.com.

When a web browser sends a request for a web page to a server, it tells the web server the name of the web host that it wants to get the page from. The web server then directs the request to the proper files and sends them to the client.

Sometimes system administrators will run many tens or hundreds of websites on the same computer. The computer that hosts these sites has one internet address. Using DNS, the names for these tens or hundreds of computers is configured to be the address of the host computer. This process is called virtual hosting.

Virtual hosts require a two part configuration, the DNS resolution and the application server. Each part must be properly configured for virtual hosting to work.

See Also: Creating a CNAME or Alias for Your Calendar